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Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin
UTIG spotlight

Expedition Will Sample Crater
Left By Dinosaur-killing Asteroid

UTIG spotlight

The Jackson School Sets Sail
in New Research Vessel

UTIG spotlight

East Antarctica Melting Could Be Explained By Oceanic Gateways

UTIG spotlight

NASA Data Peers
into Greenland's Ice Sheet

UTIG spotlight

UTIG Researchers Involved in Cayman Trough Project

Spotlights

UTIG Professor Awarded Honorary Membership in SEG

UTIG Professor and Jackson Chair in Applied Seismology Mrinal Sen has been awarded the place of Honorary Membership in the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). Find out more.

The Jackson School Sets Sail in New Research Vessel

JSG's new coastal research vessel was officially named by Scott and Eleanor Petty of the Scott Petty Foundation at a christening ceremony on April 22. The R.V. Scott Petty will carry researchers and students on excursions to collect geophysical data, including the MG&G Field Course this spring. Read more.

UTIG Researchers Involved in Cayman Trough Project

UTIG research scientists Nick Hayman and Harm Van Avendonk are part of a U.S., UK and Germany collaborative effort to gather seismic imaging data from the Cayman Trough, the long strip of low bathymetry between Honduras and Jamaica. Much of the trough is oceanic lithosphere (crust and upper mantle) that forms at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center, also known as the Cayman Rise, and crosses the trough just south of Grand Cayman. UTIG's Steffen Saustrup, Anatoly MIronov, and PhD student Jennifer Harding are also aboard the R/V Meteor on the project. You can read about their progress on a special blog here.

Expedition Will Sample Crater Left By Dinosaur-killing Asteroid

UTIG scientist Sean Gulick and his colleagues from the U.K. and Mexico are formalizing plans to drill nearly 5,000 feet below the seabed to take core samples from the crater of the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs. Read more.

East Antarctica Melting Could Be Explained By Oceanic Gateways

UTIG researchers have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica's largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. Read more.